Love me or kill me brother
I dug in the quiet earth and wrought the tomb and made these lines to memorize their doom:— EPITAPH; Equilibrists lie here; stranger, tread light; close, but untouching in each other's sight; mouldered the lips arid ashy the tall skull. Let them lie perilous and beautiful.

  1. tiagogomex:

Pallas Athena
1656
Rembrandt

    tiagogomex:

    Pallas Athena

    1656

    Rembrandt

  2. 1 hour ago  1,058 notes
  3. ancientart:

Sumerian headdress, made of gold, lapis lazuli, carnelian, and dates to ca. 2600–2500 B.C.

Kings and nobles became increasingly powerful and independent of temple authority during the course of the Early Dynastic period (2900–2350 B.C.), although the success of a king’s reign was considered to depend on support from the gods. A striking measure of royal wealth was the cemetery in the city of Ur, in which sixteen royal tombs were excavated in the 1920s and 1930s by Sir Leonard Woolley. These tombs consisted of a vaulted burial chamber for the king or queen, an adjoining pit in which as many as seventy-four attendants were buried, and a ramp leading into the grave from the ground.
This delicate chaplet of gold leaves separated by lapis lazuli and carnelian beads adorned the forehead of one of the female attendants in the so-called King’s Grave. In addition, the entombed attendants wore necklaces of gold and lapis lazuli, gold hair ribbons, and silver hair rings. Since gold, silver, lapis, and carnelian are not found in Mesopotamia, the presence of these rich adornments in the royal tomb attests to the wealth of the Early Dynastic kings as well as to the existence of a complex system of trade that extended far beyond the Mesopotamian River valley. (met)

Courtesy of & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections, 33.35.3.

    ancientart:

    Sumerian headdress, made of gold, lapis lazuli, carnelian, and dates to ca. 2600–2500 B.C.

    Kings and nobles became increasingly powerful and independent of temple authority during the course of the Early Dynastic period (2900–2350 B.C.), although the success of a king’s reign was considered to depend on support from the gods. A striking measure of royal wealth was the cemetery in the city of Ur, in which sixteen royal tombs were excavated in the 1920s and 1930s by Sir Leonard Woolley. These tombs consisted of a vaulted burial chamber for the king or queen, an adjoining pit in which as many as seventy-four attendants were buried, and a ramp leading into the grave from the ground.

    This delicate chaplet of gold leaves separated by lapis lazuli and carnelian beads adorned the forehead of one of the female attendants in the so-called King’s Grave. In addition, the entombed attendants wore necklaces of gold and lapis lazuli, gold hair ribbons, and silver hair rings. Since gold, silver, lapis, and carnelian are not found in Mesopotamia, the presence of these rich adornments in the royal tomb attests to the wealth of the Early Dynastic kings as well as to the existence of a complex system of trade that extended far beyond the Mesopotamian River valley. (met)

    Courtesy of & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections33.35.3.

  4. 3 hours ago  899 notes
    Anonymous: Is there a reason you didnt answer my question? Was it rude? (Really enjoy your blog, btw)


    I’m not sure which question you’re referring to, sorry! And I’m glad you like the blog! I’m awful at replying to messages, and I suppose this message goes out to all the people I have not replied to because I forgot or simply because I didn’t really have an answer! I get a good amount of questions daily on various issues, and most of them are anonymous which means in order to reply to all of them I would have to literally flood my followers’ dashes with it and that goes against my blogging method! That’s why I always ask people not to ask anonymous questions, there’s a much higher chance that I will reply to you personally if I have a chance to answer privately! I promise I don’t bite, and I never ever publish asks unless it’s something that I can use for my FAQ or something entirely harmless to the person who asks the question! To be clear, you could come off anon and tell me “I hate everything you stand for” and I would still reply to you privately. So please please please ask questions but do it off anon because otherwise I have a hard time dealing with it, publishing wise! Again, I’m sorry if I don’t get back at people promptly, but it’s just… I suck. I just suck, it’ not your questions it’s me..

    4 hours ago  2 notes
  5. "“No harm will come to me today,” Cersei said when the day’s first light brushed her window. “Only my pride will suffer.” The words rang hollow in her ears. Jaime may yet come. She pictured him riding through the morning mists, his golden armor bright in the light of the rising sun. Jaime, if you ever loved me…"
    Cersei Lannister | A Dance With Dragons, c. 65 (via jaimelannister)
  6. 7 hours ago  14,372 notes
  7. labsinthe:

Christina Ricci photographed by Carter Smith for W 2000

    labsinthe:

    Christina Ricci photographed by Carter Smith for W 2000

  8. 10 hours ago  367 notes
  9. 
Giambattista Valli Autumn/Winter 2010

    Giambattista Valli Autumn/Winter 2010

  10. 12 hours ago  5,202 notes
  11. 
An interviewer once said to me, “You play all these victims but they’re strong” Hello? Every woman alive on the planet right now could be described like that. Every woman alive. Every woman is fragile and strong.

Michelle Williams

    An interviewer once said to me, “You play all these victims but they’re strong” Hello? Every woman alive on the planet right now could be described like that. Every woman alive. Every woman is fragile and strong.

    Michelle Williams

  12. I’m sort of like a T-Rex in the world of female actresses. Every time a job is finished, I look at my car and think, 'Could I live in it?'

  13. 17 hours ago  694 notes